Thursday, 13 March 2014

Supermarine Spitfires.

Ok. Well it's my father's story really. Uhm. He was a. Very kind generous man. Lived his life in a very. Uh. Gentle fashion uh. Everything. In our house was maintained everything was safe that was paramount. And. His story is that uhm. Very sad story which he only told me when I was about fifty and lived with it for a very long time and it was during. National service. And he was an aeroplane err. Fitter. Working on. Supermarine Spitfires. And erm. As I told you he was a very conscientious person. Er. And. One evening. A plane landed. And he started his checking. Of this. Plane. And. He. Had to check that all the hatches were shut and. Everything. Was. In order so that the plane could take off. Uhm. But. It was really very late. And. His Superior said to him. Look you can't finish that now. Tick. Tick here. That you've done it. And come back first thing tomorrow morning. So my father was reluctant but he was young. And he was told to do it so he did that. But the next morning when he was going down to do that. He. Fell. With a cup of. I think it was a cup of tea. And he. Badly gashed his hand and had to go to I think the nearest hospital. And when he came back the plane had taken off. And then. That plane. Crashed. Crashed. Yeah. Yeah. It crashed. And. Uhm. My father said he suffered terrible. Terrible time. Regret err. You know. Real feelings of despair. Uh. When eventually they did an enquiry into the. Crash they found that. When it had been in Malta. Uhm. A fitter. Hadn't. Hadn't fitted a. What's it called again? An aero. Aerola. Aerolon. Hadn't put the pin in correctly. Put it in upside down. So it fell out while the. So that was the reason for the crash. But. My father. My father was devastated by that really.